Next Things First


The Week in Numbers, Happy 2009 Edition by charlottegee
January 2, 2009, 10:26 am
Filed under: week in numbers | Tags:

Installment #7:

In 1980, 945 newly trained general surgeons were certified in the United States. In 2008, the number was essentially the same — 972 — even though the population has increased by 79 million. In 1994, there were 7.1 general surgeons per 100,000 people. Today there are five per 100,000.

95 percent have seen costs grow for charity care, the medically indigent and bad debt. With unemployment on the rise, things are expected to get worse

Hospitals, which employ 5 million people, are reporting that donations and investment returns are down, patient visits are flat and profitable diagnostic procedures and elective surgeries are declining as people with inadequate insurance delay care

There will be about 20 million new cases of cancer a year by 2030, up from 12 million a year today

The study, the longest-running of its kind, showed the rate of hospitalized cases dropped 41 percent in the three years after the ban of workplace smoking in Pueblo, Colo., took effect.

At least 2 million older Americans are taking a combination of drugs or supplements that can be a risky mix — from blood thinners and cholesterol pills to aspirin and ginkgo capsules

Only 2 percent of all graduating medical students plan on doing primary care, because of the grinding hours and relatively low pay

HIMSS report: $25 billion stimulus needed to help speed EMR adoption

But by definition she is one of about 50 million Americans who care for a family member or friend with a chronic or disabling health condition: a spouse with Alzheimer’s, a sibling with a traumatic war injury, an aging parent, a child with physical or mental challenges.

Industry Predictions: What Are the Drivers Shaping Health Care IT in 2009?

Posted by CharlotteGee

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